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Here you’ll find interesting bits of history from all periods and countries that occurred on a particular day.

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July 20th 1944: Assassination attempt on Hitler

On this day in 1944, German Chancellor Adolf Hitler narrowly survived an assassination attempt in what became known as the July 1944 bomb plot. The plot was led by German Army Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg and several military figures who also planned a military coup d’etat after the assassination. The plan was to place a bomb under the table in a briefcase in a conference room in Hitler’s Prussian Wolf’s Lair headquarters. However one of the attendees at the meeting moved the case behind the table leg with his foot, thus deflecting the blast from Hitler, though the blast did kill four in attendance. The Gestapo arrested at least 7000 people in response to the attack and almost 5000 were executed.

1 month ago
641 notes

Today is the 69th anniversary for the execution of the Valkyrie Conspirators.

stickythings:

21st July 1944.

Once their fellow conspirator, General Fromm ordered their execution, trying to have save himself from association.

“In the name of Führer a court martial convened by me has pronounced sentence: Colonel von Mertz, General Olbricht, the Colonel whose name I will not mention, and Lieutenant von Haeften are condemned to death”.

Stauffenberg spoke out and took sole responsibility for the entire operation, saying that the other men had simply acted out his orders.
image
(Pictured; Colonel Stauffenberg)

This however would not save them.

Ludwig Beck, a highly respected former General was granted the option of suicide.

His first attempt only severely injured him, and by order of General Fromm he was shot in the back of the neck by a staff officer.

The remaining men were escorted out into a courtyard where a firing squad awaited them. One by one the men were led in front of a heap of sandy earth excavated during construction work in the courtyard and vehicle lights illuminated them.

The first to be shot was General Olbricht.

image

(Pictured; General Olbricht)

Next was Colonel Stauffenberg, who shouted “Long live holy Germany.” But as the squad positioned their guns Haeften broke away and stood in front his Colonel and was shot dead.

image
(pictured; Lieutenant von Haeften)
Colonel Stauffenberg was then shot dead, followed by Colonel Mertz.

It was 12:30am.

General Fromm did not escape from prosecution for his involvement and his obvious cover up, he was arrested and later sentenced to death.


References. 1,2,3

1 year ago
138 notes

November 7th 1944: FDR elected to a fourth term

On this day in 1944, US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was elected to an unprecedented fourth term in office. The Democratic President was first elected in 1932, defeating Republican incumbent Herbert Hoover. FDR pioneered the New Deal legislative programme which helped grow the US economy which had been failing in the Great Depression. He was elected to a third term in 1940 and following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour in 1941, FDR asked Congress to declare war and thus led America into the Second World War. He was an effective war leader, with US involvement proving a major factor in the eventual Allied defeat of Nazi Germany and their allies. However, FDR’s decision to intern Japanese-Americans during the war remains highly controversial. He won a fourth term near the end of the war in 1944 but died the following April, leaving the conclusion of the war to his successor Vice President Harry S. Truman. In order to ensure no future President could control the country for so long the 22nd Amendment was passed in 1951 to limit Presidents to two terms in office.

1 year ago
203 notes
July 20th 1944: Assassination attempt on Hitler
On this day in 1944, German Chancellor Adolf Hitler narrowly survived an assassination attempt in what became known as the July 1944 bomb plot. The plot was led by German Army Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg and several military figures who also planned a military coup d’etat after the assassination. The plan was to place a bomb under the table in a briefcase in a conference room in Hitler’s Prussian Wolf’s Lair headquarters. However, one of the attendees at the meeting moved the case behind the table leg with his foot, thus deflecting the blast from Hitler. The Gestapo arrested at least 7000 people in response to the attack and almost 5000 were executed.

July 20th 1944: Assassination attempt on Hitler

On this day in 1944, German Chancellor Adolf Hitler narrowly survived an assassination attempt in what became known as the July 1944 bomb plot. The plot was led by German Army Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg and several military figures who also planned a military coup d’etat after the assassination. The plan was to place a bomb under the table in a briefcase in a conference room in Hitler’s Prussian Wolf’s Lair headquarters. However, one of the attendees at the meeting moved the case behind the table leg with his foot, thus deflecting the blast from Hitler. The Gestapo arrested at least 7000 people in response to the attack and almost 5000 were executed.

2 years ago
139 notes

June 6th 1944: D-Day

On this day in 1944, the D-Day landings began on the beaches of Normandy as part of the Allied ‘Operation Overlord’. The largest amphibious military operation in history, the operation involved thousands of Allied troops landing in France. For those landing on the beaches of Normandy, they faced heavy fire, mines and other obstacles on the beach, but managed to push inland. In charge of the operation was future US President General Dwight Eisenhower and leading the ground forces was British General Bernard Montgomery. The landings proved a decisive Allied victory, as they secured a foothold in France which had been defeated by Nazi Germany in 1940. D-Day was a key moment in the Second World War and helped turn the tide of the war in favour of the Allies. 70 years on, we remember not just the strategic victory that was D-Day but also the ultimate sacrifice paid by thousands of soldiers on both sides of the fighting.

“You are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months.”
- Eisenhower’s message to the Allied Expeditionary Force

70 years ago today

2 months ago
16,932 notes

June 6th 1944: D-Day

On this day in 1944, the D-Day landings began on the beaches of Normandy as part of the Allied ‘Operation Overlord’. It was the largest amphibious military operation in history. 155,000 Allied troops landed in France and quickly broke through the Atlantic Wall and pushed inland. In charge of the operation was General Dwight Eisenhower and leading the ground forces was General Bernard Montgomery. It was a decisive Allied victory and a key moment in the Second World War as the Allies gained some ground on the continent following the fall of France to the Nazis in 1940.

“You are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months.”
- Eisenhower’s message to the Allied Expeditionary Force

1 year ago
569 notes
August 19th 1944: Liberation of Paris begins
On this day in 1944 Paris began to rise up against Nazi occupation during World War Two, with the help of Allied forces. The struggle continued until German surrender on August 25th. Paris had been occupied since 1940.

August 19th 1944: Liberation of Paris begins

On this day in 1944 Paris began to rise up against Nazi occupation during World War Two, with the help of Allied forces. The struggle continued until German surrender on August 25th. Paris had been occupied since 1940.

2 years ago
106 notes

June 6th 1944: D-Day

On this day in 1944, the D-Day landings begin on the beaches of Normandy as part of the Allied ‘Operation Overlord’; this was the largest amphibious military operation in history. 155,000 Allied troops landed in France and quickly broke through the Atlantic Wall and pushed inland. In charge of the operation was General Dwight Eisenhower and leading the ground forces was General Bernard Montgomery. It was a decisive Allied victory and a key moment in the Second World War as the Allies gained some ground on the continent following the fall of France to the Nazis in 1940.

"You are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months."
- Eisenhower’s message to the Allied Expeditionary Force

2 years ago
679 notes