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Here you’ll find interesting bits of history from all periods and countries that occurred on a particular day.

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June 17th 1972: Watergate break-in

On this day in 1972, five White House operatives were arrested for breaking into the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters in the Watergate complex in Washington DC. The men were aiming to wiretap the Democrats in preparation for the 1972 presidential election. The incident began the unraveling of the Nixon administration, as its illegal activities were gradually uncovered, due to the work of Washington Post reporters Woodward and Bernstein, their informant known as ‘Deep Throat’ (later revealed to be Associate FBI Director Mark Felt) and Congressional investigations. It was soon discovered the burglars had received money that had been donated to Nixon’s re-election campaign in exchange for their silence. The administration supposedly tried to cover-up its involvement in the 1972 incident, with Nixon trying to fire the special prosecutor assigned to the case and the Attorney General. It was later discovered Nixon taped his conversations in the Oval Office and the Supreme Court ordered he hand the tapes over, which implicated the President in the cover-up and led to his resignation in 1974 to avoid impeachment. Watergate is considered one of the greatest political scandals in history, and its memory lives on today in the way scandals are often suffixed ‘-gate’.

1 month ago
155 notes

November 17th 1973: Nixon says “I am not a crook”

On this day in 1973, 40 years ago today, US President Richard M. Nixon told a group of Associated Press reporters during a televised question and answer session in Orlando, Florida that “I am not a crook”. This came in the context of the revelations about illegal activities by his administration in what came to be known as the Watergate scandal. It was named for the building complex which contained the Democratic National Committee headquarters which Nixon officials broke into to find out about their electoral strategies. By 1974, it became clear that Nixon had knowledge of the illegal activities, after the Supreme Court ordered he release tapes of his Oval Office coversations. He resigned in August in order to avoid almost certain impeachment.

"People have got to know whether or not their President is a crook. Well, I’m not a crook. I’ve earned everything I’ve got"

8 months ago
298 notes
June 23rd 1972: Title IX
On this day in 1972, Title IX became effective when President Richard Nixon signed it into law. The provision prohibits sexual discrimination in education programmes which receive funding from the federal government. The amendment was authored and introduced by Senator Birch Bayh (D-IN) and was part of the 1972 Education Amendments.

"It is…an important first step in the effort to provide for the women of America something that is rightfully theirs - an equal chance to attend the schools of their choice, to develop the skills they want, and to apply those skills with the knowledge that they will have a fair chance to secure the jobs of their choice with equal pay for equal work"- Bayh’s remarks on the Senate floor

June 23rd 1972: Title IX

On this day in 1972, Title IX became effective when President Richard Nixon signed it into law. The provision prohibits sexual discrimination in education programmes which receive funding from the federal government. The amendment was authored and introduced by Senator Birch Bayh (D-IN) and was part of the 1972 Education Amendments.

"It is…an important first step in the effort to provide for the women of America something that is rightfully theirs - an equal chance to attend the schools of their choice, to develop the skills they want, and to apply those skills with the knowledge that they will have a fair chance to secure the jobs of their choice with equal pay for equal work"
- Bayh’s remarks on the Senate floor

1 year ago
38 notes
January 9th 1913: Nixon born
On this day in 1913, the future 37th President of the United States Richard M. Nixon was born. Nixon was born in Yorba Linda, California and later represented his state in the House of Representatives and the Senate as a member of the Republican Party. Nixon was Vice-President from 1953 to 1961 under President Eisenhower. He lost the 1960 election to the Democrat John F. Kennedy but later won the presidency in 1968. As President, Nixon initially increased US involvement in Vietnam and extended the war into Cambodia, but he eventually ended the war in 1973. In 1974 he became the first and only President to resign after revelations about illegal activities of his administration in the Watergate scandal. He was pardoned by his successor Gerald Ford and tried to rebuild his image until he died from a stroke in 1994 aged 81.Today marks the 100th anniversary of his birth

January 9th 1913: Nixon born

On this day in 1913, the future 37th President of the United States Richard M. Nixon was born. Nixon was born in Yorba Linda, California and later represented his state in the House of Representatives and the Senate as a member of the Republican Party. Nixon was Vice-President from 1953 to 1961 under President Eisenhower. He lost the 1960 election to the Democrat John F. Kennedy but later won the presidency in 1968. As President, Nixon initially increased US involvement in Vietnam and extended the war into Cambodia, but he eventually ended the war in 1973. In 1974 he became the first and only President to resign after revelations about illegal activities of his administration in the Watergate scandal. He was pardoned by his successor Gerald Ford and tried to rebuild his image until he died from a stroke in 1994 aged 81.

Today marks the 100th anniversary of his birth

1 year ago
27 notes

August 9th 1974: Nixon resigns

On this day in 1974 at noon, Richard M. Nixon became the first and only President of the United States to resign from office. He was replaced by his Vice-President, Gerald Ford. Nixon resigned due to the revelations of the Watergate scandal that his administration had been involved in illegal activities. These included breaking into the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate complex and wiretapping. He long denied direct knowledge, but after the Supreme Court forced him to hand over the tapes of his conversations in the Oval Office, Nixon’s involvement was clear. He resigned rather than face impeachment and almost certain removal by Congress. He was later pardoned for his crimes by Ford, who hoped his decision would help America heal and move on.

1 year ago
89 notes

40 years ago - June 17th 1972: Watergate break-in

On this day in 1972, 40 years ago, five White House operatives were arrested for breaking into the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters in the Watergate complex in Washington DC. The men were aiming to wiretap the Democrats in preparation for the 1972 presidential election. The incident was the first in a series of revelations which revealed illegal activities of President Richard Nixon’s administration and led to his resignation in 1974. It was discovered the burglars had received money that had been donated to Nixon’s re-election campaign. The administration tried to cover-up its involvement in the 1972 incident. It was later discovered Nixon taped his conversations in the Oval Office and the Supreme Court ordered he hand the tapes over, which implicated the President in the cover-up and led to his resignation to avoid impeachment. Watergate is considered one of the greatest political scandals in history.

2 years ago
104 notes

June 13th 1971: Pentagon Papers published

On this day in 1971, the New York Times began publication of the Pentagon Papers, a series of Defense Department documents which revealed secrets about US involvement in Vietnam. They contained a history of America’s involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967, revealing the questionable activities of several Presidents. Daniel Ellsberg, a military analyst, leaked the documents to the New York Times when he became disaffected with the war in Vietnam. President Nixon challenged the newspaper’s right to publish the documents, but the Supreme Court ruled in New York Times v. United States that the papers could be published. Nixon continued in his efforts to fight the release, and had his team of ‘plumbers’ attempt to ‘plug the leaks’, who eventually broke into Ellsberg’s psychiatrist’s office in an attempt to discredit him. Many of these men would go on to form the Committee to Re-Elect the President, whose illegal break in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate complex unraveled the Nixon presidency and led to his resignation. The release of the Pentagon Papers also had a more immediate impact, with revelations about the secret campaigns of the Johnson administration with its bombing of Cambodia and Laos especially outraging the public and contributing to the powerful anti-war movement within the United States.

1 month ago
86 notes

October 10th 1973: Agnew resigns

On this day in 1973 the Vice President of the United States Spiro Agnew resigned. Agnew served under President Richard Nixon until he was formally charged with bribery and income tax evasion.  Agnew was the second Vice President in history to resign from office. He was replaced by Gerald Ford, who later became President upon Nixon’s resignation over the Watergate scandal. Thus Ford is the only American President to have not been elected either Vice-President or President.

9 months ago
36 notes

May 31st 2005: Deep Throat revealed

On this day in 2005 Vanity Fair revealed the identity of the secret informant on the Watergate scandal, Deep Throat, as former FBI Associate Director Mark Felt. In the early 1970s, Felt provided Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein with information regarding President Nixon’s involvement in the scandal, which led to the President’s resignation in 1974. The article was written by Felt’s lawyer and after its release his identity was confirmed by the Post’s reporters from the time. Felt’s family convinced him to reveal himself for the potential book deals and money it would raise them. Felt died on December 18th 2008.

“I’m the guy they used to call Deep Throat.”
- Mark Felt in Vanity Fair, 2005

1 year ago
213 notes

November 17th 1973: Nixon says “I am not a crook”

On this day in 1973 US President Richard M. Nixon told a group of Associated Press reporters during a televised question and answer session in Orlando, Florida that “I am not a crook”. This came in the context of the revelations about illegal activities by his administration in what came to be known as the Watergate scandal; it was named for the building complex which contained the Democratic National Committee headquarters which Nixon officials broke into to find out about their electoral strategies. By 1974, it became clear that Nixon had knowledge of the illegal activities, after the Supreme Court ordered he release tapes of his Oval Office coversations. He resigned in August in order to avoid almost certain impeachment.

"People have got to know whether or not their President is a crook. Well, I’m not a crook. I’ve earned everything I’ve got"

1 year ago
48 notes

July 21st 1969: Man walks on the Moon

On this day in 1969, American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the Moon. The Apollo 11 mission landed on the Moon on July 20th at 20:18 UTC. Armstrong’s boot hit the surface of the Moon at 2:56 UTC the next day. Aldrin soon joined Armstrong and the pair planted the flag of the United States on the lunar surface. They received a brief phone call from President Richard Nixon. The moon landing was broadcast live, reaching an estimated global audience of 450 million. The astronauts returned safely to Earth on July 24th. The landing ended the space race and fulfilled the goal put in place by the late President John F. Kennedy in 1961 to put a man on the moon before the end of the decade.

"That’s one small step [a] for man, one giant leap for mankind"

2 years ago
128 notes
May 31st 2005: Mark Felt revealed as Deep ThroatOn this day in 2005, Vanity Fair revealed the identity of the secret informant on the Watergate scandal as former FBI Associate Director Mark Felt. In the early 1970s, Felt provided Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward with information regarding President Nixon’s involvement in the Watergate scandal, which led to the President’s resignation in 1974. There had been speculation both at the time and later that Felt was the leak, but it was not officially announced until May 31st 2005. Vanity Fair’s article was written by Felt’s lawyer and after its release, his identity was confirmed by the Post’s reporters from the time. Felt’s family had convinced him to reveal himself for the potential book deals and money it would raise them. Felt died on December 18th 2008.
"I’m the guy they used to call Deep Throat."- Mark Felt in Vanity Fair, 2005

May 31st 2005: Mark Felt revealed as Deep Throat

On this day in 2005, Vanity Fair revealed the identity of the secret informant on the Watergate scandal as former FBI Associate Director Mark Felt. In the early 1970s, Felt provided Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward with information regarding President Nixon’s involvement in the Watergate scandal, which led to the President’s resignation in 1974. There had been speculation both at the time and later that Felt was the leak, but it was not officially announced until May 31st 2005. Vanity Fair’s article was written by Felt’s lawyer and after its release, his identity was confirmed by the Post’s reporters from the time. Felt’s family had convinced him to reveal himself for the potential book deals and money it would raise them. Felt died on December 18th 2008.

"I’m the guy they used to call Deep Throat."
- Mark Felt in Vanity Fair, 2005

2 years ago
17 notes