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Here you’ll find interesting bits of history from all periods and countries that occurred on a particular day.

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May 11th 1812: Spencer Perceval assassinated

On this day in 1812 Spencer Perceval became the first and only British Prime Minister to be assassinated when he was shot by John Bellingham in the lobby of the House of Commons. Perceval became Tory Prime Minister in 1809 (replacing the Duke of Portland) and his administration had to deal with economic depression, Luddism and the ‘madness’ of King George III. He had initially been considered a weak Prime Minister, but things had been looking up for his administration until he was shot. Bellingham was a merchant with a grievance against the government for supposedly not freeing him when he was imprisoned in Russia. The assassin was hanged on 18th May.

“I am murdered…I am murdered”
- Perceval’s last words

2 months ago
136 notes

October 8th 1967: Clement Attlee dies

On this day in 1967, former British Prime Minister Clement Attlee passed away aged 84. He was Deputy Prime Minister under Conservative Prime Minister Winston Churchill in the wartime coalition government. Attlee’s Labour Party then defeated the Conservative Party in the 1945 election. He led the country in post-war recovery, most famously creating the National Health Service (NHS). He left office in 1951 after losing to Churchill and the Conservatives. Attlee died of pneumonia at Westminster Hospital in 1967.

9 months ago
26 notes

May 4th 1979: Thatcher becomes Prime Minister

On this day in 1979, Margaret Thatcher became the first female Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. She is known for her conservative policies which have become known as ‘Thatcherism’. Upon winning the 1979 general election and becoming Prime Minister, Thatcher had to deal with high employment and financial problems and responded with deregulation, privatisation and reducing the power of trade unions. She also led Britain during the Falklands War with Argentina in 1982. Thatcher was challenged by others in her party and resigned as Prime Minister in 1990. Known as ‘the Iron Lady’, Thatcher was the longest-serving British Prime Minister of the 20th Century. She died from a stroke in 2013 and remains a very controversial figure in British history.

1 year ago
68 notes
December 29th 1986: Harold Macmillan dies
On this day in 1986 the former British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan died aged 92. Macmillan became Conservative Prime Minister in 1957, replacing Anthony Eden who had been discredited by the Suez Crisis. Responding to the Crisis, and its implications for the future of the British Empire, Macmillan made a famous speech about the “wind of change” in South Africa and led the decolonisation of Sub-Saharan Africa. His administration was latterly rocked with scandals such as the Profumo affair. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1963.

December 29th 1986: Harold Macmillan dies

On this day in 1986 the former British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan died aged 92. Macmillan became Conservative Prime Minister in 1957, replacing Anthony Eden who had been discredited by the Suez Crisis. Responding to the Crisis, and its implications for the future of the British Empire, Macmillan made a famous speech about the “wind of change” in South Africa and led the decolonisation of Sub-Saharan Africa. His administration was latterly rocked with scandals such as the Profumo affair. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1963.

1 year ago
7 notes
200 years ago - May 11th 1812: Spencer Perceval assassinatedOn this day in 1812, 200 years ago today, Spencer Perceval became the first and only British Prime Minister to be assassinated when he was shot by John Bellingham in the lobby of the House of Commons. Perceval became Tory Prime Minister in 1809 (replacing the Duke of Portland) and his administration had to deal with economic depression, Luddism and the ‘madness’ of King George III. He had initially been considered a weak Prime Minister, but things had been looking up for his administration until he was shot by Bellingham who was a merchant with a grievance against the government for supposedly not freeing him when he was imprisoned in Russia. Bellingham was hanged on 18th May.
"I am murdered…I am murdered"- Perceval’s last words

200 years ago - May 11th 1812: Spencer Perceval assassinated

On this day in 1812, 200 years ago today, Spencer Perceval became the first and only British Prime Minister to be assassinated when he was shot by John Bellingham in the lobby of the House of Commons. Perceval became Tory Prime Minister in 1809 (replacing the Duke of Portland) and his administration had to deal with economic depression, Luddism and the ‘madness’ of King George III. He had initially been considered a weak Prime Minister, but things had been looking up for his administration until he was shot by Bellingham who was a merchant with a grievance against the government for supposedly not freeing him when he was imprisoned in Russia. Bellingham was hanged on 18th May.

"I am murdered…I am murdered"
- Perceval’s last words

2 years ago
49 notes

February 5th 1788: Robert Peel born

On this day in 1788 the future Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Robert Peel, was born. Peel was born in Bury, Lancashire and his father was a famous industrialist and Member of Parliament. Peel was educated at Oxford, and entered politics at the young age of 21 in 1809. Peel became Home Secretary in 1822, and served for the duration of the ‘liberal’ government of Lord Liverpool until 1827. As Home Secretary, Peel created the modern police force, leading to officers being known as ‘bobbies’ and ‘peelers’ after him. Peel became Prime Minister in 1834, and again in 1841. As Prime Minister, Peel repealed the Corn Laws and issued the Tamworth Manifesto which led to the formation of the modern Conservative Party.

2 years ago
3 notes

May 4th 1979: Thatcher becomes Prime Minister

On this day in 1979, Margaret Thatcher became the first female Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. She is known for her conservative policies which are now commonly referred to as ‘Thatcherism’.  Her Conservative party’s victory in the 1979 general election came twenty years after she was first elected to Parliament to represent Finchley. Upon becoming Prime Minister, Thatcher had to deal with high employment and financial problems that crippled the country, to which her government responded with deregulation, privatisation and reducing the power of trade unions. She also led Britain during the Falklands War with Argentina in 1982, which propelled her to re-election in 1983. Thatcher’s popularity waned and she was eventually challenged for the Conservative leadership by others in her party and thus resigned as Prime Minister in 1990. Known as ‘the Iron Lady’, Thatcher was the longest-serving British Prime Minister of the 20th Century. She died from a stroke in 2013 and remains a very controversial and divisive figure in British history.

2 months ago
350 notes

May 11th 1812: Spencer Perceval assassinated

On this day in 1812,Spencer Perceval became the first and only British Prime Minister to be assassinated when he was shot by John Bellingham in the lobby of the House of Commons. Perceval became Tory Prime Minister in 1809 (replacing the Duke of Portland) and his administration had to deal with economic depression, Luddism and the ‘madness’ of King George III. He had initially been considered a weak Prime Minister, but things had been looking up for his administration until he was shot by Bellingham who was a merchant with a grievance against the government for supposedly not freeing him when he was imprisoned in Russia. Bellingham was hanged on 18th May.

“I am murdered…I am murdered”
- Perceval’s last words

1 year ago
35 notes
February 5th 1788: Robert Peel bornOn this day in 1788 the future UK Prime Minister, Robert Peel, was born in Lancashire. Peel was educated at Oxford, and entered politics aged 21. Peel became Home Secretary in 1822, and served under Lord Liverpool’s ‘liberal’ government. As Home Secretary, Peel created the modern police force, leading to officers being known as ‘bobbies’ and ‘peelers’. As Prime Minister, he repealed the Corn Laws and issued the Tamworth Manifesto which led to the formation of the modern Conservative Party.

February 5th 1788: Robert Peel born

On this day in 1788 the future UK Prime Minister, Robert Peel, was born in Lancashire. Peel was educated at Oxford, and entered politics aged 21. Peel became Home Secretary in 1822, and served under Lord Liverpool’s ‘liberal’ government. As Home Secretary, Peel created the modern police force, leading to officers being known as ‘bobbies’ and ‘peelers’. As Prime Minister, he repealed the Corn Laws and issued the Tamworth Manifesto which led to the formation of the modern Conservative Party.

1 year ago
15 notes

October 8th 1967: Clement Attlee dies

On this day in 1967, former British Prime Minister Clement Attlee passed away aged 84. He was Deputy Prime Minister under Conservative Prime Minister Winston Churchill in the wartime coalition government. Attlee’s Labour Party then defeated the Conservative Party in the 1945 election. He led the country in post-war recovery, most famously creating the National Health Service (NHS). He left office in 1951 after losing to Churchill and the Conservatives. Attlee died of pneumonia at Westminster Hospital in 1967.

1 year ago
29 notes
April 4th 1721: Robert Walpole becomes the first British Prime MinisterOn this day in 1721 under King George I, Whig politician Sir Robert Walpole became the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. Whilst there was no official position of ‘Prime Minister’, Walpole was First Lord of the Treasury and leader of the Cabinet, thus making him de facto Prime Minister. Every Prime Minister is now also the First Lord of the Treasury. His term is the longest in British history, from 1721 to his resignation in 1742 when he was succeeded by Spencer Compton, Earl of Wilmington.

April 4th 1721: Robert Walpole becomes the first British Prime Minister

On this day in 1721 under King George I, Whig politician Sir Robert Walpole became the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. Whilst there was no official position of ‘Prime Minister’, Walpole was First Lord of the Treasury and leader of the Cabinet, thus making him de facto Prime Minister. Every Prime Minister is now also the First Lord of the Treasury. His term is the longest in British history, from 1721 to his resignation in 1742 when he was succeeded by Spencer Compton, Earl of Wilmington.

2 years ago
4 notes

January 22nd 1924: Ramsay MacDonald becomes the first Labour Prime Minister of the UK

On this day in 1924 Ramsay MacDonald became the first ever Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. MacDonald came to power in 1924, having earned public respect for his opposition to the First World War. His first government had a minority in the Houses of Parliament and thus relied on support of the other left-wing party: the Liberals. His government lasted nine months, but was defeated in the 1924 General Election. MacDonald returned to power in 1929, and thus faced the challenges of the Great Depression. His party was divided over the issue, and in 1931 MacDonald formed a National Government, with a majority of Conservative MPs. Therefore MacDonald was expelled from the Labour Party for his ‘betrayal’.

MacDonald stepped down in 1935, thus ending the first period of Labour governance, and died in 1937. Since MacDonald, the Labour Party have established themselves as a major party in the UK. Its Prime Ministers have included Clement Attlee, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown.

2 years ago
3 notes